Carbon dating age of

For more on this subject, see the video Bones in Stones i. Ogden III, "Annals of the New York Academy of Science," 288 (1977): 167-173. Since 1947, scientists have reckoned the ages of many old objects by measuring the amounts of radioactive carbon they contain.This assumption is backed by numerous scientific studies and is relatively sound.However, conditions may have been different in the past and could have influenced the rate of decay or formation of radioactive elements.It is assumed that we are dealing with a closed system—no loss of either parent or daughter elements has occurred since the study material formed.No scientist can guarantee that any sample can be considered a closed system unless it was isolated from its environment when it was formed.They will argue that the clock was not reset if the age is too old, or that isotopes were selectively removed if the age turns out to be too young.

Thus radioactive dating relies purely on assumptions.

But it is already clear that the carbon method of dating will have to be recalibrated and corrected in some cases.

Scientists at the Lamont-Doherty Geological Laboratory of Columbia University at Palisades, N.

Elements can be transported into a sample or leach out of a sample.

Scientists will reject theories about the age of the earth that do not conform to the norm.

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